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Taxpayers received about $659 million in refunds during fiscal year 2023, representing a 2.7 percent increase in the amount of refunded to taxpayers in the previous fiscal year.


The IRS announced that final regulations related to required minimum distributions (RMDs) under Code Sec. 401(a)(9) will apply no earlier than the 2025 distribution calendar year. In addition, the IRS has provided transition relief for 2024 for certain distributions made to designated beneficiaries under the 10-year rule. The transition relief extends similar relief granted in 2021, 2022, and 2023.


The IRS, in connection with other agencies, have issued final rules amending the definition of "short term, limited duration insurance" (STLDI), and adding a notice requirement to fixed indemnity excepted benefits coverage, in an effort to better distinguish the two from comprehensive coverage.


The Tax Court has ruled against the IRS's denial of a conservation easement deduction by declaring a Treasury regulation to be invalid under the enactment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


For purposes of the energy investment credit, the IRS released 2024 application and allocation procedures for the environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation under the low-income communities bonus credit program. Many of the procedures reiterate the rules in Reg. §1.48(e)-1 and Rev. Proc. 2023-27, but some special rules are also provided.


The IRS has provided a limited waiver of the addition to tax under Code Sec. 6655 for underpayments of estimated income tax related to application of the corporate alternative minimum tax (CAMT), as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169).


The IRS has issued proposed regulations that would provide guidance on the application of the new excise tax on repurchases of corporate stock made after December 31, 2022 (NPRM REG-115710-22). Another set of proposed rules would provide guidance on the procedure and administration for the excise tax (NPRM REG-118499-23).


The Internal Revenue Service is still working on the details of how it is going to help taxpayers that may have fallen for deceptive marketing that led them to improperly receive employee retention tax credits.


The IRS has announced that calendar year 2023 would continue to be regarded as a transition period for enforcement and administration of the de minimis exception for reporting by third party settlement organizations (TPSO) under Code Sec. 6050W(e).


The IRS has released the annual inflation adjustments for 2024 for the income tax rate tables, plus more than 60 other tax provisions. The IRS makes these cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) each year to reflect inflation.


The 2024 cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) that affect pension plan dollar limitations and other retirement-related provisions have been released by the IRS. In general, many of the pension plan limitations will change for 2023 because the increase in the cost-of-living index due to inflation met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. However, other limitations will remain unchanged.


The IRS reminded taxpayers who may be entitled to claim Recovery Rebate Credit (RRC) to file a tax return to claim their credit before the April-May, 2024 deadlines. It has been estimated that certain individuals are still eligible to claim RRC for years 2020 and 2021. The deadlines to file a return and claim the 2020 and 2021 credits are May 17, 2024, and April 15, 2025, respectively. Additionally, the IRS reminded that taxpayers must first file a tax return to make their RRC claims irrespective of income slab and source of income.


The Internal Revenue Service is looking to improve its customer service metrics as well as improve its technology offerings in the coming tax filing season.


The Internal Revenue Service announced the launch of the first phase of rolling out business taxpayer accounts, as well as enable taxpayers to respond to notices online.


For 2024, the Social Security wage cap will be $168,600, and social security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits will increase by 3.2 percent. These changes reflect cost-of-living adjustments to account for inflation.


The Internal Revenue Service could release as soon as today the process that businesses can use to withdraw employee retention credit claims.


The Internal Revenue Service detailed how it is proceeding with a pilot program that will allow taxpayers to file their taxes directly on the IRS website as an option along with doing an electronic file or working through a tax professional or other third-party tax preparer.


The IRS released substantial new guidance regarding the new clean vehicle credit and the used clean vehicle credit. The guidance updates procedures for manufacturer, dealer and seller registrations and written reports; and provides detailed rules for a taxpayer’s election to transfer a credit to the dealer after 2023. The guidance includes:


The IRS has released the 2023-2024 special per diem rates. Taxpayers use the per diem rates to substantiate certain expenses incurred while traveling away from home. These special per diem rates include:


The IRS provided guidance on the new energy efficient home credit, as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (P.L. 117-169). The guidance largely reiterates the statutory requirements for the credit, but it provides some new details regarding definitions, certifications and substantiation.


The IRS identified drought-stricken areas where tax relief is available to taxpayers that sold or exchanged livestock because of drought. The relief extends the deadlines for taxpayers to replace the livestock and avoid reporting gain on the sales. These extensions apply until the drought-stricken area has a drought-free year.


With the Internal Revenue Service announcing more details on how it will be targeting America’s wealthiest taxpayers, Kostelanetz’s Megan Brackney offered up some advice on preparing for increased compliance activity.


The IRS has cautioned taxpayers to be vigilant about promotions involving exaggerated art donation deductions that may target high-income individuals and has also provided valuable tips to help people steer clear of falling into such schemes. Taxpayers can legitimately claim art donations, but dishonest promoters may employ direct solicitation to make unrealistically promising offers. In a bid to boost compliance and protect taxpayers from scams, the IRS has active promoter investigations and taxpayer audits underway in this area.


Amid a growing number of scams and fraudulent activity surrounding the Employee Retention Credit, the Internal Revenue Service will stop processing new claims, effective immediately, at least through the end of the year.


The Department of the Treasury is reaching out to Congress to get the appropriate tools to combat the wave of Employee Retention Credit fraud and other future issues.


The Internal Revenue Service detailed plans on some of the high-income taxpayers that will be targeted for more compliance efforts in the coming fiscal year.